Knit A Norwegian

The KNIT A NORWEGIAN KAL on Ravelry began at midnight 2010 Norwegian time and I am finally going to knit my Dale of Norway Sirdal sweater!  I love this classic pattern and I will be knitting it in a classic color, navy blue.  The Sirdal buttons are discontinued but I was able to find some on-line.  Huzzah for Google!  Here is a picture from the pattern book.

The sweater is named after a very popular ski resort in Norway.  I wonder how the skiing in Norway compares to Colorado Rocky Mountain skiing?  How can Norwegian skiers not be incredible athletes as they zip down those peaks anticipating lounging around in the ski lodge in their beautiful Norwegian sweaters?

I would love to go to Norway someday.  My husband’s maternal grandmother was from Norway.  And, my daughter has married into a family that, not only descends from Norway, but is steeped in rich Norwegian traditions.  I think it is prudent for me to learn all I can about traditional Norwegian knitting just in case there will be some wee Norwegian grandchildren born some day who would love to wear Norwegian sweaters made by their non-Norwegian grandmother.

I’m off to a good start.  This sweater does not have ribbing.  It starts off by knitting nine rounds, purling a row for the fold line and then casting on steek stitches.  At that point you join and start knitting in the round.  A sweet little hem.  You also knit the first inches in a smaller needle changing to the larger one when you get to the Main Pattern.  Interesting.  I’m not sure why other than perhaps to draw the sweater in a bit at the hem since there is nor ribbing.  If any of you Dale of Norway experts know please fill me in!

I’m pretty pumped about focusing on the one-sweater-at-a-time resolution I made for New Year’s Eve.  Having to deal with those unfinished and uninspired sweater UFOs last month convicted me.  Fortunately, turning them into pillows helped me realize that I did love them at one point enough to start them.  I’m enjoying looking at them as pillows more than I did looking at them with guilt as they lay in knitting baskets!

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8 thoughts on “Knit A Norwegian

  1. How do you find these KAL projects ahead of time? What yarn
    are you knitting yours with and where did you purchase it and
    what book is the pattern from. I would love to knit one but it
    maybe too late to join in or rather I would be way behind everyone!

  2. What a beautiful sweater that’s going to be!

    I think the reason for the smaller needle on the hem facing is so that the hem doesn’t flare out. Keeping in mind that the facing actually needs to be slightly smaller in circumference that the outside of the sweater in order to fit in it neatly when you fold it up, it makes sense that it’d be done on smaller needles. I’ve also seen it done with the same size needle but 10% fewer stitches than the main body.

  3. Gorgeous sweater!

    I’d love to see more of your pillows please — I think that is a great idea – how to recycle those not just quite right projects that you don’t want to totally finish!

    Have a great 2010!

  4. That is going to be gorgeous! I haven’t done any Norwegian knitting, but I’d suspect the needle size change might be to keep the hem from flaring out once it’s done. Also, it looks like the hem is just one color, so the main pattern part would be a little denser, perhaps it’s so the gauge matches better.

  5. Hello, I recently found your blog and I’ve been reading it from the start. No I was reading your January 2010- stories and dicided to answer your question, eventhough it’s 9 months ago you asked.
    I’m Dutch, and to me it’s normal to use a smaller sice of needles, and fewer stiches.
    Doing these 2 things both, makes sure the sweater will fit in good shape, with a smaller facing.
    I don’t think it’s Norwegian, maybe it’s European, in German knitting patterns you’ll find it too. In Dutch patterns a facing is made by using smaller sice of needles and making a facing with 1K1P or 2K2P.
    Funny, I find no difficulties in reading your blog in English, but writing this down, I’m not always shore about my spelling. Please forgive me if I made mistakes!
    I’ve put your blog to my favourites, so I can keep on reading en looking at your gorgeous knitting!
    Anja

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